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commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
last point because my mind is on -- of course to say we need to learn about bob and these guys, locke's second treatise of government comes out of -- who argues for monarchy. and monarchy is looking better and better in the middle east. if there's one country that seems to have figured it out, so far, is morocco. and maybe that should be a model for other places in the region as well. >> thank you, bret. brian. >> my basic arguments for our side of the debate, an argument for reality of opening your eyes and seeing where we are today, two years into these uprisings and these changes. and in a region of the world just narrowly focused on the middle east which has about 20 countries, you have seen political change at least the leadership in four of them. in two of those countries we've seen islamist forces come to power through the ballot box. in the two others, islamist political parties are playing some sort of role, more marginal in libya. we are at the start of the process, and i think our response from washington has been very sort of philosophical and intellectual but not very ope
and bob dole never had a child and she said we never had children. i really can't answer. it was kind of an abstract question. the next day the media said she isn't really ready for the campaign trail because she isn't talking like a candidate in the personal and all of a sudden within three weeks, the campaign had kind of folded. i think michael dukakis's problems in terms of the presidential debate when he was asked about what he would do when his wife was raped and he had a very loyal kind of answer, a defense of the opposition to capital punishment in all the sudden we said it does he have a human side. we see into the capabilities and into the character of the individuals. i can get all or was first in the years not just because of the one he sent but because of him being played out out as a serial exaggerate your -- exaggerate her. he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create with the perception of him being in a laboratory setting on the computer and during that. he was very important and became the international legislation, but he had that story, then he h
been submitted to bob patrick and the veteran's history project at the library of congress. for years and years researchers can find the interviews and use the stories for the future projects. these men represent the less than 2 million world war ii veterans living today. men and women who fought across the world, to defend and protect not only our country from harm, but something much more fundamental. our freedom. freedom is the big ideal. it's used a lot used in washington, d.c. i sometimes wonder if it lost the potent sei. when joe was liberated. there was out pouk on the cot next to him. he died that soldier died the day after the liberation fobbing -- took place. the wall behind me reminds all that many paid the ultimate prize. those who made it home hugged their families, returned to work, and hardly ever talked about the war again. this me more yule allowed them to open and share the sometimes. sometimes for the first time ever. on the day he was liberated joe was asked about the experience and he said he learned two things. to pray at the nazi prison camp and every day is a b
provide greater efficiencies. we were able -- bob gates before me begin that effort, achieved about, i believe about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that, in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now, and i asked, i asked that question when he first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary, vis-À-vis the service chief? and the reality is that there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. but having said that, there are a hell of a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon, and we will. >> as the defense department deals with the downsizing the services, have you considered cuts to the number of flag and general officers? >> you know, again i think, i think that's part and parcel of, as you do force reduct
to avoid the sequestration. >> bob samuelson, "washington post". i think the proposals are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000, and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there's much speculation thamuch speculr cuts in the pentagon budget would reduce the additional cuts in both the army and the marines. if the marines was put in a position where it had to occupy and protected the oil field of the persian gulf for an extended period of time say five or six years are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the reasons at least i was able to get through as chairman is to try not to speculate much on hypothet speculate much on hypothetical. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now, and i think they are in the 13 budget, so basically they have been on the hill, the beginning of them they have been on the hill for the better part of a year and they are reductions both of chiefs of those to services and the chairman also. clearly, and i did as well when i was the chairman over year ago, there was a need to come down. there was an expectati
the fiscal cliff. senator bob corker also spoke to reporters. >> good morning. i am lamar alexander. this is my colleague bob corker. merry christmas to you three points to make and then i would like to introduce cementer corker. here is the first point. when the dust settles and everything is said and done, federal individual income taxes are not going to go up on almost all americans next year. that needs to be settled this weekend by the votes and after the first of the year, so that's the most important point for americans to know. for almost all americans when the dust settles taxes, individual income taxes won't be going up next year. all the talk is about taxes but what we should talk about today is the medicare fiscal clef, the looming bankruptcy in the program that seniors depend upon to pay the medical bills for the millions of americans who are counting the days until they are eligible for medicare so they can afford the medicare bill, it would be a tragedy if when they get to that day there isn't enough money to pay the bills but according to the medicare trustees that d
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
considering. now, even some democrats have been open to this idea. according to bob woodward's book, "the price of politics," the white house was willing to look at changing the c.i.p. as part of the so-called grand bargain last year. the simpson-bowles commission included it as one of their solutions. the president himself reportedly had a version of chained c.i.p. in his latest offer on the fiscal cliff. madam president, that's progress. it shows that some democrats are open to serious ideas and real solutions. because we need to do something to relieve the burden of washington's crushing debt, this is something to consider. more revenue is going to have to be part of the solution and republicans have said so. substantial cuts in spending must be part of the answer as well washington does noav problem, ia spending problem. that problem is centered on entitlement programs that are growing far too quickly. switching to the chained c.p.i. is a reasonable first step that we could take now to start to rein in washington's out-of-control spending so that we can save and protect social securit
of the n.s.a., general alexand alexander, with bob mueller at the f.b.i. we've had eric holder appear before the committee to discuss this. and we have heard from intelligence community professionals involved in carrying out surveillance operations, the lawyers who review these operations and, importantly, the inspectors general who carry out oversight of the program and have written reports and letters to the congress with the results of that report. i'd like to just show that classified letter, if i might. it's classified -- i can't read it to you -- but i just want to make that available -- members know that if they want to read the i.g. letter on why what senator wyden is asking for cannot be done, please, before you vote, go to our skiff and read the letter. i don't happen to have it here but as soon as somebody brings it, i will waive it for a -- i will wave it for a moment so that you see it. the committee's review of f.a.a. surveillance authorities have included the receipt and examination of dozens of reports concerning the implementation of these authorities over the past fo
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
for broad conversation. so with that let me know who is here with us the chief staff to governor bob macdonald and from the state of oklahoma where she is the chief of staff to governor mario and at the end, roxanne white joining us from the great state of colorado where she is the chief of staff to governor john hickenlooper. they are all professionals in their career. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and then we will come down this way. >> thank you for the report. it provides a good framework for all of us to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform and colorado. our pension is about 69% solvent. we did a major reform in the last administration and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%, and so to give you a sense of how far they were beyond the state if the battle was whether or not the state has a right to ratchet down the cola for our state employees that we could see the need to go to 25% compensation by 2020, so it's very important that we are able to give you the litigation in terms
and keep your question as brief as you can. >> yes, bob with british medical journal. most of the talk it's been about impact on the federal budget and balancing one versus another. what analysis has been done on the exchanges, on the impact of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? by hypothesis would be that they would make them less employable in some ways. either that, or takes away from employers providing insurance. on the consumer side, how is it that these increased costs affect access to care and quality of care? >> paul, do you want to start the first part of that? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest that any of the medicare eligibility age would increase where employers would not offer coverage at all. for the vast majority of them, employers outside of industries where retiree health plans are highly concentrated, in fact the medicare eligibility age would be large in some employees would continue in the workforce longer because of the subsidies
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13